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A quick Google search will pull up a number of Image to CSS conversion tools but we’ve come across none as impressive as Img to CSS.

I’ve personally tried the tool out on a number of complex images and each has resulted in near flawless pure HTML versions of each.

Why would you favor that over an actual image? Well in many cases a CSS/HTML file should be smaller in size. However when you’re converting rather complex images, that isn’t generally the case. So the other reason you would use CSS/HTML over an image is for use within emails. Most email clients will block images for security purposes but if images are in fact pure CSS/HTML, that isn’t the case. It’s worth noting that it’s only worth converting small images like icons and logos as large emails are likely to be blocked by email providers -so this is ideal for use within email signatures for example.

Image to CSS converts all major image types to CSS, it retains transparency (although some email clients might not support it) and the CSS/HTML is in-line, so it won’t be stripped out in emails. Upon signing up for Img to CSS, you get 5 free conversions. Once you’re depleted then 2 conversions will set you back $1. The minimum amount you can spend is $5, so that’s 10 conversions. If you plan on converting a number of images, you can also pay a $30 monthly subscription.

Here’s a generator that’s particularly cool because it emulates the Photoshop layer styles window. If you’re not into design the novelty might escape you, but if you are, here’s a fun way to generate some of that CSS code if you just don’t feel like writing out a million vendor-specific prefixes today.

Here’s a generator that’s particularly cool because it emulates the Photoshop layer styles window. If you’re not into design the novelty might escape you, but if you are, here’s a fun way to generate some of that CSS code if you just don’t feel like writing out a million vendor-specific prefixes today.  Here’s a generator that’s particularly cool because it emulates the Photoshop layer styles window. If you’re not into design the novelty might escape you, but if you are, here’s a fun way to generate some of that CSS code if you just don’t feel like writing out a million vendor-specific prefixes today.

Startup founders and employees of GroupMe, Turntable.fm, Birchbox, RockMelt, Path and a slew of other companies have just put their spin on the Internet’s biggest hit of 2011 — Rebecca Black‘s “Friday.”

The “holiday” parody from First Round Capital features 22 startups and a handful of venture capitalists belting out original lyrics set to Black’s inescapable auto-tuned song (listen to the original below).

Lyrics in this rendition of “Friday” highlight startups’ journey toward obtaining funding. “VCs in the front seat, VCs in the back seat,” they sing. “Gotta make my mind up, which one should I take. It’s the first round, first round. You only get one first round.”

Just like Black gave us a helpful tune to remember the days of the week, the startups use the song’s bridge to remind us how funding rounds work: “The next round is second round, and the third round comes afterwards.”

When developers have the ability to craft applications for multiple platforms with little to no barrier, amazing things can happen. 6Wunderkinder is a prime example of this, as it managed to deliver its popular Wunderlist productivity app to additional platforms in short order thanks to a partnership with Appcelerator. But not every developer has the time (or resources) to forge such a relationship, and thanks to Friday’s release of Nitobi’s PhoneGap 1.0, they don’t have to.

PhoneGap is an HTML5 platform that allows developers to use HTML, CSS and JavaScript to create native mobile applications. Now developers can write their app once and deploy it to six major mobile platforms and app stores, including iOS, Android, BlackBerry, WebOS, Bada and Symbian. With the open source code receiving contributions from a dedicated community of developers, PhoneGap has increased in both stability and durability – which has played a large part in the project averaging approximately 40,000 downloads per month at the time of writing.

While PhoneGap 1.0 was officially released by Nitobi at PhoneGap Day in Portland, Oregon on Friday, the company is based in Vancouver, BC. In fact, The Next Web Canada covered PhoneGap’s initial launch late last year. But the building of PhoneGap has been an effort that goes well beyond the team at Nitobi, a fact that is not lost on company CEO Andre Charland.

Today, at the Future of Web Design in New York City, Brooklyn based designer and developer Josh Clark took the stage to discuss the 7 Myths of Mobile Web Design.

“Our jobs are getting harder… We’re inundated by all these different screens. But this is also really exciting. How often do new platforms come around?…We’ve got the coolest job in the world. We have to figure out how to use these platforms. It’s one of the most exciting times in the history of our culture.”

-Josh Clark

According to Clark, designers are anthropologists who should view platforms as if they were cultures. So, what makes a mobile culture different from a desktop culture? “We tend to oversimplify mobile needs. And we risk building dumbed down apps that patronize our users,” he says. Designers have lots of mobile mindsets and cultural presumptions. These are the quick takeaways from Clark’s brilliant breakdown:

  1. Mobile users are rushed and distracted. Wrong. Mobile isn’t just on the go. It’s on the couch, in the kitchen, and during a 3 hour layover. When we’re on mobile, we’re micro-tasking, we’re local and we’re probably bored.
  2. Mobile=Less. Wrong. Mobile is not less. Mobile is not light. Designers make too many assumptions with screen size. Don’t limit functionality based on-screen size alone. “Saying mobile design should have less is like saying paperbacks have smaller pages, so we should remove chapters,” Clark says.
  3. Complexity is a dirty word. Wrong. Complexity is awesome, it gives our lives texture. Designers shouldn’t confuse complexity with complication. They need to manage complexity, not kill it. He cites the new Facebook iOS app as a great example of a complex app done well.
  4. Extra taps and clicks are evil. Wrong. It’s all about Tap Quality > Tap Quantity. Designers can create one big idea per screen instead of one big idea per app. He cites Twitter app’s well designed keyboard that simply slides in and out of view so that secondary tasks are just one tap away.

When it comes to designing for mobile devices, nothing beats seeing your work on the device you made it for. But before any code is deployed, your best bet is to rely on the highest quality mockups you can find — They’ll let you take advantage of any given product, both its strengths and its weaknesses.

Designing within your constraints saves tons of time in the longrun, and clients (along with nearly everyone else) will certainly prefer a fully-polished look. Most importantly, as mobile devices like smartphones and tablets continue to grow in popularity, everyone from UI designers to web developers should be keeping these new screens in mind.

Here’s 13 Photoshop PSDs and Vectors for iOS, Android, and Nokia devices. Pick your favorite and put them to work!

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