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The place to learn about SEO. Articles & Experiences of novices & experts

What would happen if all of the hard work you put into your website was all wiped away by a hacker or malicious virus of some kind? It would be difficult to find the motivation to start all over unless you have a backup of some kind. Using your already established Dropbox account, several options are available to Backup WordPress Sites to Dropbox.

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To take out some of the work out of backing up your site, below we will show some ways to automate the process and save the backup to Dropbox. The easier and more hands off the process is, the better, right? Below are some WordPress plugins and other options to help you easily backup your WordPress site.

 

Note: Depending on the size of your site and how much you use your Dropbox account, opening a dedicated Dropbox account for these backups might be a good idea.

WordPress Backup to Dropbox saves you the hassle of using your FTP client and making a total backup of your WordPress site. The first backup will take some time to complete because everything is being backed up: files, media, and database are all included. WordPress Backup to Dropbox creates a folder in Dropbox. This folder is the only folder this plugin can access.

After the initial full backup, each backup from then on will be an incremental backup. The incremental backups can be scheduled as frequently as daily. The scheduled backups can exclude different file types if desired.

 

Android posted a series of infographics on Thursday with impressive app stats to celebrate its 10 billionth downloadfrom the Android Market.

Android users from 190 countries download apps every day, according to one of the infographics. The U.S. is not the most app crazed country either — it ranked fourth behind South Korea (no. 1), Hong Kong (no. 2) and Taiwan (no. 3). Rounding out the top ten includes Singapore (no. 5), Sweden (no. 6), Israel (no. 7), Denmark (no. 8), the Netherlands (no. 9) and Norway (no. 10).

Meanwhile, the top categories for Android app downloads include games (25.6%), entertainment (12.2%), tools (11.7%), music (4.28%) and social (4.08%).

 

But the most interesting tidbits were associated with how Android owners use their apps. About 12 billion miles are navigated on Google Maps each year — which is equivalent to more than 37,000 trips to the moon — and 100 million words are translated every week in 200 different countries on Google Translate.

As for when most people download apps, searching through the Android Market the night before the work week starts is evidently a common activity. The most popular time to download an Android app is 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, while the least popular time to do so is just seven hours later at 4:00 a.m. Monday morning.

Other interesting Android app stats include the following:

  • About 1.87 million hours were spent on the popular movie database app IMDb in the past four months.
  • The equivalent of 5,054 years are spent playing with popular gaming app Talking Tom, during which Tom has been knocked down 10.6 billion times.
  • Users of the car racing app Asphalt would owe $3.2 billion in speeding ticket fines if they took their driving habits to the streets.
  • 10 billion cans have been knocked down playing Can Knockdown. That’s a whole lot of cans.

Mitchell Harper is co-founder of BigCommerce, a leading provider of shopping cart software used by more than 40,000 organizations worldwide. Mitchell has written and published over 300 articles relating to software development, marketing, business, social media and entrepreneurship.

While many companies are still focusing SEO efforts on their websites, there are many other ways to boost search results, especially since results are now comprised of all kinds of content, including videos, images, maps, business listings, tweets and even Facebook Page posts.

So how do you expand your efforts without breaking the bank? To boost SEO, consider creating a YouTube channel. Every video you post to your channel can be tagged and indexed, increasing the odds your brand name will appear in natural searches for keywords associated with your business.

Creating your own channel is pretty simple — here are four easy steps to kick things off right.

Blogging is huge in South Korea, where most of the population go online everyday — through their phone, tablet device or personal computer — and local firm TNM is very much a major player in the space.

Strong community

The startup has built a 300 blogger strong platform of news and analysis based on partnering with some of the country’s most influential “power bloggers”, whose audiences are vast and dedicated. The company, which was founded in 2009 by Seung-eun Myung and Young Han, selects its contributors based on their levels of traffic and quality of content, with an emphasis on recruiting enthusiasts with expertise in their field.

TNM also helps foster a sense of community between bloggers with frequent events, workshops and parties that enable its partners to meet face to face.

Making money

The firm generates revenue in a number of ways, including the provision of content from its network to traditional media outlets which, for bloggers, can mean the negotiation of contracts that would be difficult to gain off their own back. Ads on the site are delivered through its own advertising network, which operates in a similar way to Federated Media in the US, while TNM provides social media and blog consultancy to clients through which it draws additional income.

Monetisation is not limited to the site itself however, and the company creates and sells mobile software and web platforms that are designed by its team of developers. In the past, its projects have included All That, a series of apps to promote operator SK Telecom’s flagship T-Store service, and its web development activities have produced more than 100 different apps, which have seen a total of 4,500,000 downloads.

The Social PR Guide Series is supported by Mynewsdesk. Our online newsroom makes it easier to exchange news with key influencers, reach top of search engines and automatically update your social media channels.

Lots of companies benefit from having a blog. For some, it’s a friendly, accessible way to say hi to devoted fans, curious onlookers and likely a few haters and skeptics. For others, it’s simply the way they communicate important messages. The role of public relations professionals in this chatty puzzle is to help companies build, shape and fine-tune their public voice. In fact, many PR campaigns aren’t complete without a blog strategy. But building a client blog from the ground up can be daunting. So where do you begin?

Start, With Help

When it comes to picking out a blog platform, there are certainly plenty to choose from, but Jeff Davis, who runs the content services team at San Francisco-based PR firm LaunchSquad, generally points clients towards WordPress, a mostly-free, open-source platform. Davis also makes another point: When you’re just starting out, don’t go DIY. “If you’re building something strategic for a client, even if it’s small scale, hire a WordPress developer to handle set up, find the right plugins and design a nice UI. It can be fairly inexpensive and is critical to building a blog that will work the way you need it to quickly and effectively.”

With a bit of help, WordPress’ initial set up process is simple and fast, and yet it offers a huge range of customization and configuration options. And with thousands of plugins, there is one that will satisfy any need that you can think of, often for free. For those who are coordinating blogs for multiple clients, WordPress also offers admin features for easy management across the board.

Optimize, But Not Too Much

According to Rich Brooks, President and “Chief Blogging Officer” at Flyte New Media, your SEO practices should have a very simple goal: rank high in search results for the things that your client’s customers are looking for. He recommends starting with a keyword analysis service like Raventools, WordTracker or Google Adwords’ keyword tool.

According to recently released figures from eMarketer, Facebook‘s revenue for advertising alone — which excludes revenue for virtual currencies and other sources — came to an astonishing $1.86 billion for all of last year. Not bad for a web startup that’s yet to see its seventh birthday.

As we reported last month, Facebook was on track to reach the $2 billion mark for revenue in 2010. When other revenue streams are counted along with ad revenue, it’s easy to imagine that the $2 billion revenue was achieved and possibly exceeded in the past year.

As users spend more and more on Facebook Credits, which got an extensive roll-out through online and brick-and-mortar retailers throughout 2010, the virtual currency is likely accounting for an increasing amount on Facebook’s balance sheets. After all, Facebook collects around 33 cents on the dollar for Credits spent within the Facebook ecosystem of apps and games — games that grow more popular with each iteration.

As for the ads, Facebook’s serving more than 50 billion display ads per month and was on track to serve 1 trillion display ads for the year.

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