Social networking sites account for the most referral traffic to all websites just behind organic search. So you better be optimizing for more sharing. But it’s not just slapping a Tweet button and producing link-bait content that people will Like and Retweet.

Here are 5 fresh user experience ideas for boosting how much your site gets shared:

1. Package Bite-Sized Content That Can Be Easily Shared And Tweeted

People are happy to share (good) content. Social networks have made it generally frictionless with instant publishing via distributed share buttons. But it’s up to you to also package (not just produce) content that people want to share.

It’s one thing to write a detailed, insightful blog post. It’s another thing to allow visitors to quickly Tweet specific insightful quotes from your post, or tweet out the best comments from the discussion. Users already do this manually by editing default Tweets with the content they want to include. But imagine if that work were already done FOR users, and they knew sharing would be a work-free experience… Full article

by Matt Kaludi on October 9, 2012

One of the biggest secrets behind the success of every published author is an incredible marketing plan for their book. Even when looking at book proposals one of the things that a publisher will look for is a solid marketing plan. First I would recommend you look at this post by Ryan Holiday. It’s his book marketing plan in a nutshell and considering you couldn’t browse the web without running into his name the week of his book launch, I’d say it was well executed.

1. Guest Posts

The same way you grow your blog by guest posting on sites with audiences bigger than yours, guest posts are an integral part of a promotion plan to raise awareness of your book. This is why you’ll notice guests posts from the same author across a several blogs you read the week their book launches. It’s what Michael Ellsberg refers to as the Tim Ferriss effect.

2. Email Blasts

If you’ve done everything right, you should have a solid e-mail list. Most authors prepare their audience for the launch of their book by sending several emails about their book prior to the launch. If you don’t prepare your email list for the fact that your book is coming, it’s a bit like inviting people to your birthday party on the day of and being surprised that nobody shows up.

by Matt Kaludi on October 9, 2012

There’s a theme I’ve been hearing from brands and retailers lately. The time has been spent, the vibrant fan base has been built, and it’s time to generate some real return on our social investments – but how?

Well, we know it’s not a question of volume. After all, there’s no shortage of content being created by brands of all shapes and sizes. Most have someone in-house managing social media full-time, and they’re tweeting, posting and pinning with the best of them.

It’s not an “information overload” question either, contrary to what many experts have been suggesting. In fact, according to new research, “the high volume of information available these days seems to make most people feel empowered and enthusiastic”.

The daily deluge of updates from friends, family, news networks and brands doesn’t look to be scaring customers away, but it’s not generating the return anyone expected either. It seems the question, then, isn’t the quantity of posts in social, but rather the quality of what’s being posted. The social customer is unique, and they need to be marketed to in a way that’s sensitive to their needs. What’s the message you’re sending them? Are you promoting product in an exciting and engaging way, or just keeping the customer in touch with your brand? If the goal is to drive product discovery, encourage deeper product exploration and create brand affinity and loyalty (and chances are one of these goals exists for every brand today), it’s about what you say, not how many times you say it.

by Matt Kaludi on October 9, 2012

Something big has happened to social media.

In case you hadn’t noticed, social media is big – and getting bigger all the time. What was once the domain of just a small number of people is now everyday currency in and outside of business. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn etc are now familiar channels for many of us. Now 23% of all the time we are online takes place on social networks and blogs. Internet users are now spending more time on Facebook than on any other web brand combined (Source: Nielsen).

Business is quickly catching on to the potential, with recent research showing that a third of companies in the UK now put up to 20% of their marketing budget into business social networking (Source: Regus).

Why many businesses still aren’t getting it

Social media’s growing profile can make it look like a relatively simple way to generate leads. Social media was the leading emerging channel for lead generation in 2010 (Source: Hubspot Marketing) and many companies already see it as the next step in attracting more customers. But the reality is a great deal less simple. Here are just a few reasons why:

  • More noise: As the business take up of social media increases, so does the marketing ‘noise’ – making it even more of a challenge to stand out.
  • Missing links: Many businesses have the drive, but lack the strategy. They see where they want to get to in terms of income or leads, but they’re missing the crucial links to make social media work truly effectively for them.
  • Minus the strategy: The returns of social media can be tempting. After all, the proportion of UK companies successfully winning new customers through social networking activity rose from 33% in 2010 – to 41% in 2011 (Source: Regus). But many businesses are still engaging in social media activity without a long-term strategy, often creating initial interest, but failing to convert it into sales.

by Matt Kaludi on October 8, 2012

Everyone is always talking about how important it is to start a blog, grow a brand, write quality content, guest post on other blogs and so on… All of that is great and it is all necessary, but how many people are going to continually start new blogs without a business model? It happens every day and it’s going to keep on happening for many years to come.

In this post I am going to tell you why you should start your own coupon based blog, how other people can build the site for you, make money with it and then even sell it for a nice pay day after a few months time.

First Things First, Start the Blog!

It’s a coupon blog… it’s not brain surgery. There are already millions of coupon blogs out there, you just need to figure out how to do it better and get your content in front of the right audience.

You can come up with your own site design or use a pre-built coupon theme like what AppThemes.com has to offer. You can even outsource the process and hire someone to add daily content for you, or you can also use datafeeds from merchants on ad networks. In the end it’s still about updating often with new coupons and content that people find useful.

by Matt Kaludi on October 8, 2012

Habits are behaviours you repeatedly do day after day. Some are good, some are bad. They transcend in all different areas of your life, including when you blog. Here are five bad blogger habits that you want to avoid or stop doing to become a better blogger.

1. Checking your stats and comments 100 times a day

As a beginning blogger it is not uncommon to be obsessed over your web traffic and comments. Of course you want a lot of people coming to your blog, a lot of people linking to you and you naturally want as many people as possible commenting on your posts. That doesn’t mean that you have to check your stats every 10 minutes.

This habit will waste you a lot of time that can be channeled in much more productive activities for your blog. Set aside a time of the day where you check your stats. My suggestion would be twice a day. Once in the morning and some time late afternoon. Use that saved up time for producing more content or networking with other bloggers.

2. Not replying to comments

When people are leaving a comment behind on one of your posts, see that as a compliment. They were emotionally compelled to leave feedback behind, good or bad. What I see is that most bloggers never respond to them. If there is one big thing that helps in building loyal readers, it is responding to comments on your blog. It shows you care about them, even to readers who didn’t leave a comment behind.

Read full article here

by Matt Kaludi on October 8, 2012

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